International Journal of Play Therapy® Tests


Starting with the January 2018 issue, earn non-contact continuing education credit by completing tests based upon the International Journal of Play Therapy®. APT Members may refer to their print or online journal access to complete the tests.

  • Price includes CE test only.


Continuing Education

APA. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. APT maintains responsibility for this program and its content.



NBCC. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5636. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. APT is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.



APT. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) offers continuing education specific to play therapy. APT Approved Provider 95-100 maintains responsibility for the program.


Sessions

Exploring the Impact of Child - Centered Play Therapy on Academic Achievement of At-Risk Kindergarten Students


Date : July 2019

Volume Issue : Volume 28, Issue 3

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

This study of at-risk Kindergarten students examined the effectiveness of child-centered play therapy (CCPT) on academic achievement. The experimental group received biweekly, 30 min play therapy sessions for 6 weeks. Findings indicated that the Kindergarten students participating in the experimental group in this study (n = 18) demonstrated a statistically significant increase on the Early Achievement Composite of the Young Children’s Achievement Test (Hresko, Peak, Herron, & Bridges, 2000) when compared to children in the wait-list control group (n = 18). Results demonstrate continued support for the use of CCPT as an intervention for academic achievement.

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify risk factors for academic achievement difficulties in children.
  • Describe the effects of CCPT on academic achievement.
  • Explain the importance of using school based play therapy programs to impact academic achievment
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Therapists’ Perceptions of the Reality Play Therapy Model


Date : April 2019

Volume Issue : Volume 28, Issue 2

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

Recently a 6-week reality play therapy (RePT) model was developed for use with clients ages 7–14. RePT utilizes directive activities by integrating play and reality therapy techniques. In this study, we provided a 2-hr training on the RePT model with 24 participants in the mental health profession. At the end of the training, participants shared their perceptions of the RePT model, rated their confidence in utilizing activities from RePT, and rated the likelihood that they would utilize these interventions with child and young adolescent clients. Overall, participants reported confidence in utilizing most aspects of the RePT model and were more likely to implement the RePT activities that they felt most confident about after the training. Based on participants’ feedback, suggestions for revising and expanding the RePT model are provided, along with suggestions for future research with the RePT model.

Learning Objectives:
  • Describe and revise the RePT model to include a broader population of clients.
  • Apply trauma sensitive considerations for utilizing the RePT model.
  • Assess ways to incorporate the caregivers in the therapeutic process when using RePT.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Assessing the Utility and Fidelity of the Adlerian Play Therapy Skills Checklist Using Qualitative Content Analysis


Date : January 2019

Volume Issue : Volume 28, Issue 1

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

Because of the recent trend toward evidence-based practices, practitioners have been called to provide evidentiary support for the play-therapy modalities they have used. Although Adlerian play therapy is one of the most widely used approaches (Lambert et al., 2007) and is one of the few EBPs for play therapy (SAMSHA, 2016), it would add further credibility to the model if interrater reliability/agreement in assessing fidelity were established. In this study, we used qualitative video-content analysis of 27 individual play-therapy sessions to establish interrater reliability of using the Adlerian Play Therapy Skills Checklist (Kottman, 2009; Kottman & Meany-Walen, 2016). Results indicated acceptable interrater reliability across the four phases of Adlerian play therapy, ranging from r = .78 to r = .89. Implications for counselor education and clinical practice, limitations, and suggestions for future research are presented.

Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the existing research supporting Adlerian play therapy.  
  • Discuss the process by which the researchers used qualitative content analysis to establish interrater reliability of using the Adlerian Play Therapy Skills Checklist.
  • Describe the status of Adlerian play therapy as an evidence based practice. 
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Child-Centered Play Therapy as an Intervention for Children with Autism: Literature Review


Date : October 2018

Volume Issue : Volume 27, Issue 4

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

The purpose of this article was to systematically review the play therapy literature examining the effectiveness of child-centered play therapy with the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) population. Child-centered play therapy is shown to be an evidence-based, effective intervention for children; however, a systematic review of child-centered play therapy as an intervention with the ASD population has yet to be conducted. Even though results of the literature review show that child-centered play therapy is promising in increasing social and emotional behaviors of children with ASD, more research is needed to determine whether child-centered play therapy is an efficacious intervention with children with autism spectrum disorder

Learning Objectives:
  • Provide readers with a systematic review, examining the effectiveness of child-centered play therapy with children who have autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
  • Learn what ASD is and how child-centered play therapy is a promising intervention in increasing social and emotional behaviors of children with ASD.
  • Discuss the limitations of the reviewed studies and recommendations to strengthen future studies, and why further research on the effects of child-centered play therapy with children with ASD is strongly encouraged.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

A Child-Centered Play Therapy Workshop For Professional Elementary School Counselors: An Exploratory Study


Date : July 2018

Volume Issue : Volume 27, Issue 3

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the experiences of professional school counselors participating in a play therapy workshop as an introduction to child-centered play therapy (CCPT). Constructivism led this qualitative study to de-scribe six professional school-counselor participants’ perceptions of CCPT and their experiences in attending the play therapy workshop. This article presents a development of the workshop for professional school counselors, findings of this qualitative study, and discussion about implications for practice and research.

Learning Objectives:
  • Inform about the perceptions of professional school counselors attending a one-day play therapy workshop.
  • Present the development of a child-centered play therapy workshop tailored to the unique training needs of this population.
  • Describe the experiences of six professional school-counselors in attending the play therapy workshop.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

The Impact of Kinder Training on Young Children's On-Task Behavior: A Single-Case Design


Date : April 2018

Volume Issue : Volume 27, Issue 2

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of kinder training on young children’s on-task behavior in the classroom. This study utilized an experimental single-case methodology and a multiple baseline across subjects design. Three elementary school teachers conducted weekly individual play sessions with three students they identified as frequently exhibiting off-task behavior. The findings provide support for kinder training as an effective play-based professional development training model that can improve students’ on-task behavior. Results demonstrated that all student participants showed improvement in on-task classroom behavior. Visual analysis revealed that all student participants demonstrated a positive change in on-task behavior during the intervention phase. All teacher participants reported observing improvement in the student participants’ on-task behavior and teacher–student relationships.

Learning Objectives:
  • Provide readers with the knowledge on kinder training, a play-based teacher intervention model.
  • Discuss the therapeutic impact of kinder training on early elementary school children’s classroom on-task behavior.
  • Learn the procedure of kinder training single-case design implementation and data analysis.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Exploring The Experiences of Play Therapists Working With Children Diagnosed With Autism


Date : January 2018

Volume Issue : Volume 27, Issue 1

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

The number of children diagnosed with autism continues to be on the rise (Hess, 2009),and professionals strive to gain more knowledge concerning treatment. A review of the literature reveals the use of play as 1 type of intervention for children with autism.Although there is a great deal of literature on the behavioral approaches to working with children diagnosed with autism, there is limited research on the use of child-centered play therapy (CCPT). CCPT is an approach that was designed to work with children dealing with a variety of problems. The present study used a phenomenological design to explore the experiences of play therapists utilizing CCPT with children diagnosed with autism. Ten interviews were conducted with Registered Play Therapists and Registered Play Therapist-Supervisors who utilize CCPT with children diagnosed with autism. The data collected through the interviews was organized and analyzed through NVivo software. The data analysis indicated 3 major themes and 8 subthemes. The 10participants expressed that although there are challenges working with children diagnosed with autism, the benefits were primarily the environment, the therapeutic relationship, and their role as the therapists when utilizing CCPT. The participants found that these aspects of CCPT had the greatest influence in meeting the needs of children diagnosed with autism. Additionally, the therapists experienced the involvement of parents being of greater value with children diagnosed with autism compared with the involvement of parents with other clients.

Learning Objectives:
  • Provide results of a phenomenological study of the experiences of Registered Play Therapists/Supervisors who work with children diagnosed with autism.
  • Provide an understanding of the impact these therapists' experiences can have on the profession of play therapy and on the types of interventions used with this population.
  • Readers will better understand the characteristics of child-centered play therapy that attribute to these participants choosing to continue utilizing this approach with children diagnosed with autism.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Impact of Child-Teacher Relationship Training on Teacher Attitudes and Classroom Behaviors


Date : July 2020

Volume Issue : Volume 29, Issue 3

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

Teachers often report a lack of training on effective ways to support the emotional needs of children. Working in schools where students experience poverty and/or low student achievement can be stressful for teachers. This study examined the impact of child–teacher relationship training (CTRT) on teachers’ professional quality of life, social justice attitudes, attitudes aligned with the values of CTRT, attitudes about trauma-informed care, and the ability to demonstrate the CTRT skills in the classroom. The results indicate that the intervention had an impact on teachers’ attitudes about trauma-informed care, attitudes aligned with the values of CTRT, and ability to demonstrate the CTRT skills in their classrooms. Limitations, directions for future research, and implications for school-based play therapists and school counselors are discussed.

Learning Objectives:
  • Describe two ways this project modified child teacher relationship training
  • Describe three outcomes of the study
  • Describe how the attitudes and values of child teacher relationship training is related to the values of trauma informed care
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Incorporating Interpersonal Neurobiology in Child Relationship Therapy


Date : April 2020

Volume Issue : Volume 29, Issue 2

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

Child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) focuses on improving the parent–child relationship, helping children by teaching parents to be therapeutic agents in their children’s lives. A primary element of CPRT is the supportive group format of 6−8 parents that includes elements of didactic learning and group support. The information in this article serves as a foundation for the use of interpersonal neurobiology (IPNB) in CPRT groups. The application of IPNB in specific areas of counseling related to CPRT including counselor education, play therapy, group therapy, and psychoeducation is still new but shows promise for understanding and improving counseling. IPNB can be utilized as a vehicle for gaining a deeper understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms of CPRT, and IPNB can be intentionally integrated into CPRT group curriculum to enhance learning for group members and their children.

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify primary concepts of CPRT.
  • Discuss foundational concepts of IPNB that are relevant to CPRT.
  • Explain how IPNB can be used to support the CPRT process.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Play Therapists’ Attitudes Toward Using Technology in the Playroom


Operation Level : Intermediate

Date : January 2020

Volume Issue : Volume 29, Issue 1

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

The use of technology such as Internet, cell phones, televisions, and video games is a staple part of many children and adults’ lives (Harwood et al., 2011; Hull, 2015; National Association for the Education of Young Children & the Fred Rogers Center, 2012). Professionals disagree about the appropriateness of technology in play therapy settings (e.g., Hull, 2015; Landreth, 2012; Ray, 2012). We surveyed 40 registered play therapists or registered play therapist supervisors to specifically address play therapists’ attitudes and experiences using technology in play therapy. Support for using technology in playrooms was mixed; we defined and provided examples of the 5 themes that emerged from the interviews.

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify the five themes current RPT/S report as significant to their perceptions of the use of technology in the playroom. 
  • Compare RPT/S’ perceptions of advantages and disadvantages of using technology in the playroom.
  • Compare RPT/S' perceptions of how technology can enhance or detract from building the therapeutic relationship.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00
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