International Journal of Play Therapy® Tests


Presentations: 1

Starting with the January 2018 issue, earn non-contact continuing education credit by completing tests based upon the International Journal of Play Therapy®.

ATTENTION: The fee does not include publication material, price includes CE test only. APT Members must consult their print or online International Journal of Play Therapy prior to completing tests online.

 
Continuing Education

990f08cb6f305985a4acbc9fb5bf8c04.jpg

APA. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. APT maintains responsibility for this program and its content.


fe5bde07bfdf3d8bf107d7967bf8d345.jpg


NBCC. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5636. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. APT is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.


41588e4dd4010be647512ac45f5d44dc.jpg


APT. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) offers continuing education specific to play therapy. APT Approved Provider 95-100 maintains responsibility for the program.


Sessions

Effectiveness of Child-Centered Play Therapy among Marginalized Children

Credits: None available.

Marginalized children are often excluded from mainstream social, economic, cultural, and political life because of ethnicity or poverty. These children are more likely to have behavior problems that place them at risk later in life. The impact is evident at an early age. The purpose of this article was to review the literature that examined the impact of child-centered play therapy (CCPT) conducted with marginalized children. The literature was reviewed with regard to the results of the studies, the outcome variables used, the identification of who completed the assessments about the children, and the ethnicity of the play therapists who conducted the interventions. The findings demonstrated that CCPT is effective for marginalized children, externalized behaviors are most frequently assessed, teachers most frequently completed the assessments about the children, and the ethnicity of the play therapists is not usually reported. The results are considered in terms of implications for play therapists and future research.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the impact of child-centered play therapy (CCPT) interventions conducted with marginalized children.
  • Describe the outcome variables examined.
  • Assess the ethnicity of the play therapists who conducted the interventions.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

School-Based Filial Therapy in Regional and Remote New South Wales, Australia

Credits: None available.

School-based filial therapy (SBFT) programs are training programs for teachers, school learning-support officers, and teacher’s aides (paraprofessionals) working in regional and remote primary-school settings. The program educates paraprofessionals in the therapeutic foundations and skills involved in facilitating child-centered play therapy (or, “special play sessions”) with children who have mild to moderate emotional and behavioral disturbances. The program is delivered in regional or remote locations over 3 days in a didactic and experiential format. When paraprofessionals become competent with therapeutic protocols involved in facilitating special play sessions, they design program implementations in their school settings to ensure the specific needs of each community are being met, in collaboration with their local school communities. This involves the use of local resources and abilities that take into consideration the unique cultural aspects of each school and community. Where children’s mental health treatment is limited by access, culture, stigma, low socioeconomic status, and/or isolation, the SBFT program provides one possible solution: prioritizing and supporting locally determined, rather than prescriptive, implementation of the program. This specific program aims to address the many barriers people living in rural communities face when they attempt to access specialist mental health care, thus potentially delivering better health outcomes. As such, this program can be adapted anywhere around the world where health-care delivery and accessibility are challenging, especially for young children.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Inform readers about the current gaps in mental health care for rural children in New South Wales, Australia.
  • Discuss the clinical processes involved in the design and implementation of a program to address these gaps.
  • Provide a comprehensive outline of the School-based Filial Therapy program and its theoretical foundations.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Play Therapy with African American Children Exposed to Adverse Childhood Experiences

Credits: None available.

African American children living in poverty often experience adverse childhood conditions such as overexposure to violence, either witnessing domestic violence or community violence, or direct victimization. These conditions can cause an increase in future mental health problems. In this pilot study, 12 African American children ages 5–9 participated in six weeks of child-centered individual play therapy followed by six weeks of group play therapy. Individual and group play therapy addressed the participants’ problematic behaviors as reported by teachers at an after school program for disadvantaged youth. Findings indicated that a combination of individual and group child-centered play therapy significantly decreased problematic behaviors affecting academic performance and the classroom overall. The combination of individual and group interventions also demonstrated a significant decrease in general worry and negative intrusive thought patterns. The results support therapists utilizing individual and group child-centered play therapy when working with children who experience adverse childhood experiences. Further research is needed to understand the impact of child-centered play therapy as a preventative intervention for children at-risk for developing mental health problems.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss how child-centered play therapy individual and group interventions can be effective in treating African-American children who have been exposed to multiple adverse life experiences.
  • Provide research regarding the impact of child-centered play therapy as a preventative intervention for children at-risk for developing mental health problems.
  • Demonstrate how individual and group child-centered play therapy significantly decrease problematic behaviors affecting academic performance and the classrom overall.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Utilizing Child-Centered Play Therapy With Children Diagnosed With Autistm Spectrum Disorder and Endured Trauma: A Case Example

Credits: None available.

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a prevalent childhood disorder as 1 in 68 children,8 years old and younger, are diagnosed with ASD. Additionally, childhood trauma impacts 60% of children living in the United States. Due to the lack of social awareness and increased sensitivity to various stimuli, children diagnosed with ASD are often more prone to victimization. Current treatment interventions for ASD are limited inflexibility and adaptive qualities. Flexibility is especially important for this population;therefore, a more responsive and open therapeutic approach is need. A case study is presented illustrating an adapted child-centered play therapy approach for children on the spectrum who have also endured trauma.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Illustrate how Child-Centered Play Therapy fills the gaps presented by other forms of treatment for ASD.
  • Demonstrate the effectiveness of Child-Centered Play Therapy for children on the spectrum who have endured trauma.
  • Demonstrate how the CCPT play stages may differ with children on the Autism Spectrum and who have endured trauma.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Psychopharmacology for Play Therapists

Credits: None available.

In this article, we explain why play therapists should be familiar with the effects and side effects of psychiatric medications. Nonphysician therapists are an important part of the “clinical team” in any inpatient or outpatient setting. Since the physician prescriber spends a relatively brief amount of time with a client, as opposed to the time spent with the psychotherapist, it is in the hands of the nonphysician professionals to become proficient in discovering problems and unwanted effects of medications, and report it to the client’s guardians and/or physician prescriber for reevaluation. This article focuses on the side effects of medications commonly prescribed to children with psychiatric conditions, and we explain how play therapists may tailor their play therapy interventions to cope with the side effects of medications. The side effects range from insignificant/temporary (e.g., dry mouth, stuffy nose), significant/permanent (e.g.,tardive dyskinesia), to life threatening disorders (e.g., serotonin syndrome). By under-standing the psychopharmacology, therapists can get a better grasp about the cause of new psychological or behavioral complaints. For example, excessive yawning during the interview may be due to side effects of Prozac (fluoxetine) rather than fatigue or sleep deprivation. But Prozac can also cause nightmares that result in sleep interruption and frequent yawning. Clinical literature indicates that by understanding the lethargy experienced in the child, the play therapist can tailor play therapy sessions to outdoor activities to allow for sun exposure and fresh air.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss the importance of familiarity with the effects and side effects of psychiatric medications for play therapists.
  • Inform about the vital role non-physician therapists have in patients' clinical team in both the inpatient and outpatient setting.
  • Explain how therapists may tailor the play intervention to cope with side effects of medications.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Child–teacher relationship training exclusively in the classroom: Impact on teacher attitudes and behaviors

Credits: None available.

Teachers often report a lack of training on effective ways to support the emotional needs of children. Working in schools where students experience poverty, as well as low student achievement, can be stressful for teachers. This study examined the impact of child-teacher relationship training (CTRT) on teachers’ professional quality of life, attitudes aligned with the values of CTRT, attitudes about trauma-informed care, and the ability to demonstrate the CTRT skills in the classroom. This third and final year of the project focused solely on teachers’ classroom training and behaviors, completely omitting the playroom as a training tool. The results indicate that the intervention had a significant impact on teachers’ child-centered knowledge and skills aligned with the training, as well as their ability to demonstrate the CTRT skills in classrooms. Limitations, directions for future research, and implications for school-based play therapists, school counselors, and counselor educators are discussed.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Describe how child-teacher relationship training (CTRT) is a play therapy intervention.
  • Describe how play therapy interventions (e.g., CTRT) can be implemented by teachers in their classrooms.
  • Describe ways that trauma informed practices align with the goals of the CTRT play therapy intervention.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Fostering a University Partnership Using Play Therapy in Schools: Lessons Learned

Credits: None available.

Children who exhibit disruptive classroom behaviors often interfere with their classmates’ learning, miss out on opportunities, and are at risk for long term negative outcomes such as premature drop out and substance use (NAMI, 2012). Treatment for children who exhibit these behaviors has been successful through a variety of approaches including individual play therapy, treatment of the family system, and school-based interventions (Eyberg, Nelson, & Boggs, 2008; McCart, Priester, Davies, & Azen, 2006; Ray, Armstrong, Balkin, & Jayne, 2014). The authors propose a plan for developing university and school relationships to support students’ mental health needs through the implementation of a pilot study in one local school district in the Southeast United States. The authors implemented Adlerian Play Therapy for children exhibiting disruptive classroom behaviors for half of the children referred for services; whereas the other half (the waitlist-control) received group AdPT after post-assessments were completed. Learned lessons for gaining school buy-in, navigating the school protocols, and conducting research to ensure quality services are discussed. Recommendations for developing university-school relations as well as areas of future research are included.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify negative outcomes for children with disruptive classroom behaviors and understand the need for play therapy intervention.
  • Examine the lessons learned from past school-based partnerships in order to implement in future play therapy research.
  • List the key stakeholders impacted and involved in school-based partnerships.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Healing from Adverse Childhood Experiences through Therapeutic Powers of Play: “I Can Do It with My Hands”

Credits: None available.

Children who live through adverse childhood experiences (ACE) are likely to encounter negative health outcomes in adulthood. Using a qualitative retrospective approach, the authors explored how experiences with play, expressive, and creative arts served as a protective factor for adults who were exposed to ACEs. Researchers recruited ten adults aged 25 years and older who reported four or more ACEs on a modified ACE inventory (e.g., Pliske, 2020) and did not experience negative outcomes to wellbeing, such as behavioral, physical, or chronic health conditions. Participants completed a structured family history interview and a semi-structured interview. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using grounded theory constant comparative methods. Participants noted that play and the arts provided a context for identity formation and integration of emotional and cognitive processing in relation to early trauma. Participants described how activating therapeutic powers of play, in the forms of self-expression, indirect teaching (learning through metaphor), emotional catharsis, abreaction, stress management, self-esteem, and creative problem solving (Schaefer & Drewes, 2014), attenuated the long-term impact of ACEs exposure. Play created a context for self-expression, self-care, and healing that promoted the development of posttraumatic growth following childhood trauma. Implications for intervention and social policy are discussed.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify 3 negative effects that toxic stress may cause to the developing brain.
  • Explain how 3 specific therapeutic powers of play may help combat adverse childhood experiences.
  • Discuss how significant relationships may amplify the effects of the therapeutic powers of play.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Adapting Child-Centered Play Therapy for Children with Type 1 Diabetes

Credits: None available.

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is one of the most frequently diagnosed chronic illnesses of childhood. It currently affects approximately 187,000 children and adolescents under the age of 18 years in the United States, and the prevalence continues to rise (Centers for Disease Control [CDC], 2020). While current research on the use of child-centered play therapy (CCPT) with children with T1D is lacking, research demonstrates that children with this disease are more likely to experience symptoms of anxiety and depression than children without chronic illness (Buchberger et al., 2016; Rechenberg,Whittemore, & Grey, 2017). The use of CCPT as an intervention for children with this chronic illness demonstrates promising opportunities. Many play therapists working outside of medical settings, such as hospitals, may be unfamiliar with T1D. Therefore, many play therapists may not yet understand the considerations and adaptations to CCPT needed for children with T1D and their parents. Children with T1D face many unique challenges that can influence their mental health, and it is important for child-centered play therapists to consider adapting CCPT to meet these challenges as they implement play therapy for this population.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Define Type 1 Diabetes in childhood
  • Describe the unique challenges that children with Type 1 Diabetes face
  • List accommodations and adaptations for CCPT with children living with Type 1 Diabetes
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Child-centered Play Therapy’s Impact on Academic Achievement: A Longitudinal Examination in at-Risk Elementary School Students

Credits: None available.

Children identified as at-risk for school failure need additional intervention for school success. Given the link between emotional development and academic success, it is crucial that schools have effective methods for identifying these students in need and have preventative programs that are developmentally appropriate interventions. The present study examined the long-term impact of child-centered play therapy (CCPT) on a diverse group of at-risk second grade elementary students implemented through Primary Project. The qualifying group received ten 30-minute play therapy sessions throughout one academic semester during their second grade year. In a longitudinal analysis for academic growth, the long-term impact on both the third grade and fourth grade years was measured by the Measure of Academic Progress (MAPS). The findings reveal implications for identification of and interventions for at-risk elementary students and CCPT as an intervention for academic achievement, specifically reading and mathematics scores. Recommendations for future research are also included.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods

Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss the impact Child-Centered Play Therapy has on elementary students’ academic achievement.
  • Utilize integrated Child-Centered Play Therapy and Primary Project Model to effectively identify at-risk student and implement preventative programs in elementary schools.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00