International Journal of Play Therapy® Tests


Presentations: 1

Starting with the January 2018 issue, earn non-contact continuing education credit by completing tests based upon the International Journal of Play Therapy®.

ATTENTION: The fee does not include publication material, price includes CE test only. APT Members must consult their print or online International Journal of Play Therapy prior to completing tests online.

 
Continuing Education

990f08cb6f305985a4acbc9fb5bf8c04.jpg

APA. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. APT maintains responsibility for this program and its content.


fe5bde07bfdf3d8bf107d7967bf8d345.jpg


NBCC. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5636. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. APT is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.


41588e4dd4010be647512ac45f5d44dc.jpg


APT. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) offers continuing education specific to play therapy. APT Approved Provider 95-100 maintains responsibility for the program.


Sessions

Part 2: A Qualitative Examination of Play Therapy and Technology Training and Ethics

Credits: None available.

Technology use is rapidly expanding among children and adolescents (Harwood et al.,2011), yet it is unclear whether current trends in play therapy are adapting to address these trends. Further, little research has addressed the current training that play therapists receive in the use of technology. Ethically, therapists must obtain initial training and maintain competence in a particular treatment area to ensure effective application of a clinical intervention. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate clinicians’ training and understanding of the ethics of technology in the playroom.Participants included 13 registered play therapists (RPTs) and registered play therapist-supervisors (RPT-Ss). For the present study, the researchers conducted semi structured interviews and used qualitative content analysis research methodology to complete data analysis. Results suggest a general lack of familiarity with standards and ethics and adequate training in this area, though most participants expressed prospective comfort with technological interventions if they received adequate training opportunities. Findings from the study yield implications for training opportunities and clinical interventions.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Develop a brief understanding about the societal shift toward technology and how this influences play therapy practice.
  • Provide readers with knowledge about play therapists’ training regarding incorporation of technological interventions in play therapy.
  • Provide awareness about play therapists’ present understanding of the standards and ethics of technology use in play therapy.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $ 10.00

The Impact of a Brief Neuro-Collaborative Play-Based Intervention on the Presentations of Developmental Trauma and Attachment Difficulties in Adopted Children: A Service Evaluation

Credits: None available.

Since 2015 over 25,000 looked after children have entered adoptive placements in England. Estimates suggest that 92% of these children entered care due to experiences aynonymous with the prodromal stages of developmental trauma. It is therefore critical for adoptive families to have access to successful post-adoption therapeutic support strategies that demonstrate efficacy in practice-based settings. Therefore, the current service evaluation aimed to evaluate the success of a brief Theraplay®-based neuro-collaborative therapeutic package focusing on reducing the trauma presentations in adoptive children within adoptive families. Between September 2017 and January 2019, the effectiveness of a ten week therapeutic intervention was evaluated utilising a within subject pretest-posttest design with 47 families. The intervention included one hour of family therapy based on the principles of Theraplay®, one hour of therapeutic re-parenting training for parents, and one hour of sensory integration and mindfulness activities for children. Therapeutic outcomes were measured using the TSCYC, CBCL, BRIEF-2, and ACC. Significant reductions in difficulties were reported in levels of anxiety, anger, post-traumatic stress arousal, sexual concerns, social problems, thought problems, inhibiting impulses, self-monitor, emotional control, behavioural regulation, and non-reciprocal interactions. This service evaluation suggests that the brief Theraplay®-based neuro-collaborative therapeutic package shows promise in reducing the behavioural presentations of developmental trauma in adopted children. The evaluation provides support and awareness for the use of neuro-collaborative Theraplay®-based interventions as post-adoption support strategies.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Seminal / Historically Significant Theories
  • Skills & Method
  • Special Topics
  • Cultural and Social Diversity

Learning Objectives:
  • Demonstrate knowledge regarding the integration of play-therapy and sensory regulation activities for adoptive children and families.
  • Demonstrate increased awareness of neurocollaborative practice which refers to the concurrent use of a number of therapies targeting different brain areas: In this paper play-therapy and sensory regulation activities.
  • Demonstrate enhanced understanding that play-therapies can be successfully delivered in integrative fashions and in shorter packages which can be as brief as 10-weeks.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $ 10.00

Strengthening the Efficacy of Adlerian Play Therapy Through the Measurement Model

Credits: None available.

To promote the credibility of play therapy and encourage the trend of practitioners utilizing evidence-based practices (EBPs), researchers are called to continue providing evidence and establishing fidelity within the leading approaches in the field. Past studies have identified Adlerian Play Therapy (AdPT) as one of the most widely used approaches (Lambert et al., 2007) as well as an EBP (SAMSHA, 2016). Through the use of qualitative video content analysis of 27 individual play therapy sessions, researchers created the instrument, the Adlerian Play Therapy Measurement Model (AdPTMM) to establish and evaluate fidelity of treatment.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Seminal / Historically Significant Theories

Learning Objectives:
  • Assess the fidelity of a clinician using AdPT
  • Assess the behaviors of the clinician and/or the child client to transition to the next phase
  • Communicate the target mechanisms per phase of AdPT
Speaker(s):
Standard: $ 10.00

Impact of group theraplay on the social–emotional assets and resilience in children with hearing loss

Credits: None available.

Theraplay is a useful and effective form of play therapy to improve social-emotional assets and resilience in children with hearing loss. Hence, this study examined the effect of Group Theraplay (GT) on the social-emotional assets and resilience in these children. The participants were selected from a rehabilitation center for mothers and children with hearing loss in Isfahan, Iran. The participants were 27 children with hearing loss who were selected by the convenient sampling method. They were randomly assigned into the intervention (n = 12) and control (n = 15) groups. The intervention group received 10 GT sessions, once a week for two and a half months, while the waitlist control group did not receive this intervention. Mothers of children completed the Social-Emotional Assets and Resilience Scale for Preschool (SEARS-Pre) 2 times, at pre and post-test. Results revealed that GT significantly influenced social competence, self-regulation, responsibility, and empathy in children with hearing loss. Therefore, participants who received GT showed a significant increase in those social-emotional assets and resilience. The findings highlight the importance of GT training for social-emotional assets and resilience in children with hearing loss. Limitations, suggestions, and implications for future research are discussed.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Seminal / Historically Significant Theories
  • Cultural and Social Diversity
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the Group Theraplay and its aims.
  • Explain the characteristics of Group Theraplay.
  • Write the core concepts of Group Theraplay.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $ 10.00

The Adult Public’s Perception of the Utility of Play Therapy

Credits: None available.

Often parents are unaware of play’s importance in children’s counseling (Brumfield & Christensen, 2011; Landreth et al., 2006). There is little research on parents’ knowledge of mental health services especially play therapy (Gallo et al., 2013; O’Connor & Langer, 2018). Literature supports the more knowledgeable parents are about mental health services, the more likely they are to take their children to therapy (e.g., Cunningham et al., 2008), and adults’ mental health literacy improves with information (e.g., Jorm, 2000). The literature revealed no research specific to play therapy literacy or the general adult public. The current study focuses on public’s perception of play therapy’s utility and whether play therapy information changes perceptions. Through Amazon Mechanical Turk, 298 participants completed a play therapy utility survey before and after receiving play therapy information. Prior to receiving information, participants believed play therapy to be useful. Initially, females indicated play therapy was more useful than male participants. The more knowledge of play therapy, the more useful the participant viewed it initially. Participants’ ratings of the utility of play therapy did increase significantly after viewing a brief educational video. The influence of the educational experience appeared to vary by race, education level, and self-reported initial awareness of play therapy. Results suggest White individuals and those who have never heard of play therapy will be most impacted by educational play therapy outreach.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Recognize the public’s perception of play therapy before the intervention was introduced.
  • Recognize which demographic groups of the public are likely to change their perception of the utility of play therapy with a brief amount of information on play therapy.
  • Recognize that mental health literacy can increase usage of therapy.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $ 10.00

Exploring the Impact of Child-centered Play Therapy for Children Exhibiting Behavioral Problems: A Meta-analysis

Credits: None available.

The authors conducted a meta-analysis exploring the effectiveness of child-centered play therapy (CCPT) approaches with children referred for disruptive behaviors across twenty-three between group studies ( N = 908). Separate meta-analytic procedures were conducted for studies that implemented wait-list/no treatment and alternative treatment comparisons to estimate the aggregated treatment effect of CCPT approaches. Results revealed medium Hedge’s g effect sizes for externalizing and overall problem behaviors compared to alternative treatment and waitlist controls, and small Hedge’s g effect sizes for aggressive behaviors. The authors explore the impact of CCPT on behavioral disruptions, implications for therapists, and ways in which therapists can utilize play therapy to meet the increasing rates of childhood behavioral disorders.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Provide specific information on the characteristics and impact of behavioral disorders during childhood.
  • Describe how CCPT can be beneficial for children who experience behavioral disorders during childhood.
  • Discuss what the results indicate for children who experience behavioral disorders during childhood.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $ 10.00

The Effect of Filial Therapy on the Interaction of Deaf Mothers with Their Hearing Children

Credits: None available.

The current study examined the effect of Filial Therapy (FT) on interaction of deaf mothers with their hearing children. Participants were recruited from association and center of deaf people in Isfahan, Iran. The participants were 30 deaf mothers and their hearing children who selected by convenient sampling method. They were randomly divided into the intervention and control groups and each group included 15 mothers and children. The intervention group received 11 FT weekly sessions for 3 months, while the control group did not receive the intervention. Mothers completed the Child- Parent Relationship Scale (CPRS) 2 times, at pre and posttest phases. Results of MANCOVA revealed that FT significantly influenced the interaction of mother-child scores, F (1, 29) = 42.69, p < 0.001. Accordingly, it can be suggested that interaction of deaf mothers with their hearing children was significantly increased following the FT intervention.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skill and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Describe several main features of Filial Therapy.
  • Write the main goals of Filial Therapy specific to play therapy.
  • According to the VanFleet (2012) model, explain three phases of Filial Therapy during play therapy sessions.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $ 10.00

The Efficacy of Child-Teacher Relationship Training as an Early Childhood Mental Health Intervention in Head Start Programs

Credits: None available.

This randomized repeated-measured active control group study examined the efficacy of Child-Teacher Relationship Training as a mental health intervention in rural Head Start programs with at-risk children. Experimental group child participants demonstrated statistically significant decreases in total problem behaviors when compared with active control group children. All child participants exhibited improvements in targeted behaviors with small-to-moderate treatment effects. The findings indicate that CTRT positively influences children’s problem behaviors with implications for rural mental health interventions.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods

Learning Objectives:
  • Provide a rationale for utilizing interventions that address the teacher-child relationships in early childhood programs.
  • Describe Phase I and Phase II of CTRT.
  • Identify unique aspects of CTRT that help make it a beneficial early childhood mental health intervention through the lens of play therapy.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $ 10.00

Playing to Heal: The impact of Bereavement Camp for Children with Grief

Credits: None available.

Child bereavement is a difficult topic to explore and study because of stigmas indiscussing death, and because of restrictions in doing research with young children.Thus, research in childhood bereavement is limited. This study focused on children whoattended a bereavement camp after the traumatic loss of a loved one. The purpose wasto understand the participants’ grief experiences. This research study usedphenomenological inquiry and analysis methodology. Five female participants wereinterviewed for this study. In addition, participants created a sandtray world to conveytheir experiences at bereavement camp. The essence of participant’s experiences asrevealed through verbal interviews was posttraumatic growth. In addition, the essence ofparticipant’s experiences as revealed through their sandtray worlds was gaining a senseof support. Results of this study extend bereavement research to include the experiencesof children. Further, implications for professional counselors, counselor educators, andbereavement camps are emphasized.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Define Posttraumatic Growth.
  • Identify common grief themes in childrens’ sandtrays.
  • Explain the differences with trauma and grief in play therapy.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $ 10.00

Considerations for Play Therapy Research with Latino Populations

Credits: None available.

Although Latino children represent about 25% of total enrollment in the elementary school setting across United States (Musu-Gillette et al., 2016), they continue to be underrepresented in receiving mental health services (Martinez, Arriola, & Corvin, 2016; Ojeda, Flores, Rosales, & Morales, 2011; Sixbey, An, & Puig, 2017). This is concerning given that Latino children face risk factors that puts them at-risk for socioemotional and academic problems (Vazsonyi & Pan Chen, 2010). In addition, there is a scarcity of research regarding the effectiveness of mental health interventions for Latinos (Ojeda et al.). Although play therapy has been supported as an effective intervention for Latino children and their parents (Ceballos & Bratton, 2010; Garza & Bratton, 2005), more research is needed to establish play therapy as an evidenced based treatment for this population (Ojeda et al.). Thus, this article provides practical guidelines for play therapy researchers to maximize recruitment efforts, minimize attrition rates, and address important cultural values within the research. Specifically, the authors address the impact of cultural values, the acculturation level, language challenges, considerations for participant recruitment, set up of the playroom, advocacy, and social justice when conducting research with Latino populations.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Describe current research supporting the continuing need for the representation of Latino children in counseling literature..
  • Identify practical guidelines for play therapy researchers to include Latino children and their parents as participants.
  • Discuss the impact of Latino culture, language, and acculturation on play therapy research and advocacy.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $ 10.00