International Journal of Play Therapy® Tests


Presentations: 1

Starting with the January 2018 issue, earn non-contact continuing education credit by completing tests based upon the International Journal of Play Therapy®.

ATTENTION: The fee does not include publication material, price includes CE test only. APT Members must consult their print or online International Journal of Play Therapy prior to completing tests online.

 
Continuing Education

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APA. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. APT maintains responsibility for this program and its content.


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NBCC. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5636. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. APT is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.


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APT. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) offers continuing education specific to play therapy. APT Approved Provider 95-100 maintains responsibility for the program.


Sessions

Regulation Focused Psychotherapy for Children in Clinical Practice: Case Vignettes from Psychotherapy Outcome Studies

Credits: None available.

There is a need for empirically informed play therapy approaches for children with oppositional and disruptive behaviors. Regulation-focused psychotherapy for children (RFP-C) is a manualized intervention rooted in the longstanding tradition of nondirective, psychodynamic play therapy. It builds on this history by emphasizing concepts drawn from the psychodynamic construct of defense mechanisms and contemporary research on emotion regulation. By using systematic interventions that target children’s defense mechanisms against unpleasant feeling states, RFP-C promotes the development of improved implicit emotion regulation capacities and increases children’s ability to tolerate painful emotions that were previously masked by the disruptive behaviors. An overview of this play therapy approach, along with several clinical illustrations drawn from a recent pilot study and ongoing randomized controlled trial of RFP-C as a treatment for oppositional defiant disorder, is provided in order to demonstrate some of the principles of defense interpretation, parent work, and addressing the meaning of disruptive behaviors.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the three goals of child sessions in RFP-C.
  • Compare RFP-C with traditional behavioral approaches to externalizing problems in children.
  • Identify two primary mechanisms of change in RFP-C.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Facilitating Congruence, Empathy, and Unconditional Positive Regard through Therapeutic Limit-Setting: Attitudinal Conditions Limit-Setting Model (ACLM)

Credits: None available.

Therapeutic limit-setting is a complex yet critical skill for child-centered play therapists. Limit-setting models and professional discussions exist in the literature, and each is grounded in person-centered and child-centered theory. However, the existing literature does not explicitly tie all of Rogers’s (1957) 6 conditions to the concept of limit-setting. The attitudinal conditions limit-setting model (ACLM) builds on existing literature by providing a 3-part model to help play therapists make limit-setting decisions based on the attitudinal conditions of congruence, empathy, and unconditional positive regard. The model is designed to support critical reflection and intentionality in the limit-setting process and to facilitate provision of the attitudinal conditions within critical relational moments in play therapy. A case example is provided to illustrate the ACLM in practice.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Seminal / Historically Significant Theories
  • Skills and Methods

Learning Objectives:
  • Increase play therapy professional’s knowledge on setting limits in child-centered play therapy to promote the attitudinal conditions of congruence, unconditional positive regard, and empathic understanding.
  • Apply the attitudinal limit-setting model to their practice with children.
  • Provide play therapists/supervisors a method to better assess their/their supervisees’ decision-making around limit-setting.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Investigating Group Adlerian Play Therapy for Children with Disruptive Behaviors: A Single Case Research Design

Credits: None available.

Children with disruptive behaviors have an increased risk of ongoing and more severe problems throughout life. Early intervention can mitigate these consequences. We used a single-case design to research the impact of Adlerian group play therapy on children’s disruptive classroom behaviors. Results were mixed, with an overall improvement in children’s behaviors over the course of the study. Detailed results, implications, limitations, and suggestions for future studies are described.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Recognize the additions of group Adlerian play therapy compared with individual.
  • Identify the components necessary to interpret a single case research design study.
  • Recognize areas for future research opportunities.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Child-Centered Play Therapy as a Means of Healing Children Exposed to Domestic Violence

Credits: None available.

Increasingly, domestic violence is being recognized as a major concern for children today. Hamby, Finkelhor, Turner, and Ormrod (2011) of the U.S. Department of Justice discovered that approximately 8.2 million children were exposed to some form of family violence in the past year and 18.8 million over their lifetime as reported by a national survey. Witnessing physical as well as psychological–emotional violence within the family can cause serious detrimental effects to children. Younger children respond to domestic violence by having higher levels of psychological disturbance and display lower self-esteem than do older children. Likewise, other issues related to mental and physical health may manifest. Additionally, child witnesses of familial violence are taught to maintain the secret of violence; therefore, alternative forms to verbal expression are important in supporting this population. It is imperative that these child witnesses receive interventions that are developmentally appropriate and meet their unique needs. Play therapy has been proven to be a statistically effective means of treating externalizing and internalizing problems in children. Therefore it is proposed that child-centered play therapy interventions be applied when working with children exposed to domestic violence.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify and describe characteristics of type II trauma (complex trauma).
  • Identify and discuss impacts of domestic violence on children.
  • Describe ways in which Child Centered Play Therapy (CCPT) heals trauma related to domestic violence.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Child Teacher Relationship Training as a Head Start Early Mental Health Intervention for Children Exhibiting Disruptive Behavior

Credits: None available.

Head Start teachers and their aides (n = 23) were randomly assigned to either the experimental or active control group in this exploratory study of the effectiveness of child–teacher relationship training (CTRT) on 20 economically disadvantaged children exhibiting disruptive behavior. CTRT is based on the principles and procedures of child–parent relationship training (CPRT), a 10-session play based model, which uses parents and caregivers as therapeutic agents of change. Analysis of pre- to mid- to post-tests results revealed that, when compared to the active control group, CTRT demonstrated a large treatment effect on reducing children’s levels of disruptive behavior. The statistical, practical, and clinical findings of this study provide validation of CTRT as a viable early mental health intervention for preschool children in Head Start exhibiting disruptive behaviors.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Provide readers with validation for Child Teacher Relationship Training (CTRT) as a viable mental health intervention for at-risk preschool children exhibiting disruptive behavior.
  • Identify importance of utilizing teachers and caregivers as therapeutic agents to reach a greater number of children.
  • Implement CTRT in training teachers to meet children’s social emotional needs more effectively.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Turning the Focus to Behavioral, Emotional, and Social Well-Being: The Impact of Child-Centered Play Therapy

Credits: None available.

This study evaluated the impact of participating in child-centered play therapy for qualifying diverse second-grade students, implemented through the Primary Mental Health Project treatment protocol. This preventative approach focuses on the behavioral, emotional, and social skills of children through child-centered play therapy.Second-grade students at 1 elementary school were assessed by their teachers for 4types of behaviors: task orientation, behavior control, assertiveness, and peer/social skills. Results demonstrated significant improvement in all 4 areas assessed for students who qualified for and received services over the course of 1 academic year. Findings suggest that child-centered play therapy is an effective preventative approach for students who are at risk for developing adverse behaviors that could negatively impact their academic success. Implications and the importance of providing preventative intervention for at-risk children are discussed.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss the concepts related to the primary mental health project model and its implications.
  • Comprehend what behavioral, emotional, and social skills are and why they are crucial to academic success for children and youth.
  • Identify at-risk children, as well as the academic and health-related implications of at-risk children not being recognized.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Religious Faith in Play Therapy

Credits: None available.

Religious faith is a recognized healing component in children’s mental health. How-ever, no research has been conducted on religious faith in play therapy. The aim of this survey was to identify play therapists’ awareness, knowledge, and skills related to religious faith in play therapy. Results of 308 registered play therapists (RPT) or RPT supervisors participating in the study showed that 82% endorsed religious faith or spiritual belief as being central to their own identity, 75% agreed that children have spiritual awareness, 88% reported confidence in identifying their clients’ religious beliefs, and 88% reported confidence in responding to children’s questions about God in a way that honors their religion. Themes of positive and negative displays of religious faith were identified. Findings are discussed.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Recognize the role of religious faith in play therapy.
  • Develop awareness, knowledge, and skills related to children's religious faith.
  • Understand survey results of play therapists' awareness, knowledge, and skills related to religious faith in play therapy.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Part 2: A Qualitative Examination of Play Therapy and Technology Training and Ethics

Credits: None available.

Technology use is rapidly expanding among children and adolescents (Harwood et al.,2011), yet it is unclear whether current trends in play therapy are adapting to address these trends. Further, little research has addressed the current training that play therapists receive in the use of technology. Ethically, therapists must obtain initial training and maintain competence in a particular treatment area to ensure effective application of a clinical intervention. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate clinicians’ training and understanding of the ethics of technology in the playroom.Participants included 13 registered play therapists (RPTs) and registered play therapist-supervisors (RPT-Ss). For the present study, the researchers conducted semi structured interviews and used qualitative content analysis research methodology to complete data analysis. Results suggest a general lack of familiarity with standards and ethics and adequate training in this area, though most participants expressed prospective comfort with technological interventions if they received adequate training opportunities. Findings from the study yield implications for training opportunities and clinical interventions.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Develop a brief understanding about the societal shift toward technology and how this influences play therapy practice.
  • Provide readers with knowledge about play therapists’ training regarding incorporation of technological interventions in play therapy.
  • Provide awareness about play therapists’ present understanding of the standards and ethics of technology use in play therapy.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Impact of group theraplay on the social–emotional assets and resilience in children with hearing loss

Credits: None available.

Theraplay is a useful and effective form of play therapy to improve social-emotional assets and resilience in children with hearing loss. Hence, this study examined the effect of Group Theraplay (GT) on the social-emotional assets and resilience in these children. The participants were selected from a rehabilitation center for mothers and children with hearing loss in Isfahan, Iran. The participants were 27 children with hearing loss who were selected by the convenient sampling method. They were randomly assigned into the intervention (n = 12) and control (n = 15) groups. The intervention group received 10 GT sessions, once a week for two and a half months, while the waitlist control group did not receive this intervention. Mothers of children completed the Social-Emotional Assets and Resilience Scale for Preschool (SEARS-Pre) 2 times, at pre and post-test. Results revealed that GT significantly influenced social competence, self-regulation, responsibility, and empathy in children with hearing loss. Therefore, participants who received GT showed a significant increase in those social-emotional assets and resilience. The findings highlight the importance of GT training for social-emotional assets and resilience in children with hearing loss. Limitations, suggestions, and implications for future research are discussed.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Seminal / Historically Significant Theories
  • Cultural and Social Diversity
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the Group Theraplay and its aims.
  • Explain the characteristics of Group Theraplay.
  • Write the core concepts of Group Theraplay.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

The Adult Public’s Perception of the Utility of Play Therapy

Credits: None available.

Often parents are unaware of play’s importance in children’s counseling (Brumfield & Christensen, 2011; Landreth et al., 2006). There is little research on parents’ knowledge of mental health services especially play therapy (Gallo et al., 2013; O’Connor & Langer, 2018). Literature supports the more knowledgeable parents are about mental health services, the more likely they are to take their children to therapy (e.g., Cunningham et al., 2008), and adults’ mental health literacy improves with information (e.g., Jorm, 2000). The literature revealed no research specific to play therapy literacy or the general adult public. The current study focuses on public’s perception of play therapy’s utility and whether play therapy information changes perceptions. Through Amazon Mechanical Turk, 298 participants completed a play therapy utility survey before and after receiving play therapy information. Prior to receiving information, participants believed play therapy to be useful. Initially, females indicated play therapy was more useful than male participants. The more knowledge of play therapy, the more useful the participant viewed it initially. Participants’ ratings of the utility of play therapy did increase significantly after viewing a brief educational video. The influence of the educational experience appeared to vary by race, education level, and self-reported initial awareness of play therapy. Results suggest White individuals and those who have never heard of play therapy will be most impacted by educational play therapy outreach.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Recognize the public’s perception of play therapy before the intervention was introduced.
  • Recognize which demographic groups of the public are likely to change their perception of the utility of play therapy with a brief amount of information on play therapy.
  • Recognize that mental health literacy can increase usage of therapy.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00