International Journal of Play Therapy® Tests


Presentations: 1

Starting with the January 2018 issue, earn non-contact continuing education credit by completing tests based upon the International Journal of Play Therapy®.

ATTENTION: The fee does not include publication material, price includes CE test only. APT Members must consult their print or online International Journal of Play Therapy prior to completing tests online.

 
Continuing Education

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APA. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. APT maintains responsibility for this program and its content.


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NBCC. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5636. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. APT is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.


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APT. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) offers continuing education specific to play therapy. APT Approved Provider 95-100 maintains responsibility for the program.


Sessions

Intensive Child-Centered Play Therapy in a Remote Australian Aboriginal Community

Credits: None available.

Few studies have explored mental health treatment programs for Aboriginal Australian children under the age of 12 years old. Isolated locations, coupled with therapy modalities that are not developmentally and culturally suitable for children who have experienced adversities, exacerbate the typical challenges in providing health services needed for optimum child development. Therapeutic services offered in Aboriginal communities typically follow a traditional delivery of therapy, meeting no more than once a week, or less,as remoteness increases. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effectiveness of an intensive child-centered play therapy (iCCPT) program in a remote Aboriginal community with children who have experienced adversity. Pre- and post measures, utilizing Goodman’s (1997)Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, were collected from parents and teachers. Semi structured interviews were conducted with parents who participated in the program after the intervention ended. Nine child participants attended an average of 15sessions in a 10-day format. Total difficulties, as reported by both parents and teachers,diminished after the program. In particular, emotional problems, as rated by teachers,decreased over time. If replicated in a randomized control trial, these findings would suggest that an iCCPT program may be feasible and effective in remote Australian Aboriginal communities.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Provide readers with knowledge about the advantages of increasing Child Centered Play Therapy to twice daily.
  • Determine the effectiveness of an intensive Child-Centered Play Therapy (iCCPT) program in a remote Aboriginal community with children who have experienced adversity.
  • To generate and disseminate evidence-based practices when working with Australian Aboriginal Children and their families.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Play Therapists' Perceptions of Wellness and Self-Care Practices

Credits: None available.

The importance of professional helpers’ wellness and self-care has received significant attention in the past decade and is even considered an ethical obligation by many organizations for professional helpers. Play therapists, compared with providers of other treatment modalities, might be more susceptible to professional and personal impairment because they bear witness to children’s experiences through the process of play therapy, which can illicit strong emotional reactions from the client and from the therapist. They may also be at a heightened risk be cause of their nature to want to protect and nurture children. Yet no published accounts of research were found to elaborate specifically on play therapists’ wellness attitudes and experiences. We surveyed Registered Play Therapists and Registered Play Therapist-Supervisors about their perceptions, practices, and suggestions for wellness and self-care. Results provide preliminary and exploratory data, implications for play therapists and supervisors, and suggestions for more research on this topic.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Inform about the elements this group of play therapists use to define wellness and the importance of self-care.
  • Discuss what this group of play therapists consider to be self-care strategies, and ways self-care strategies are used to improve or maintain play therapists' wellness.
  • Identify potential strategies and implications sfor improving individual’s self-care practices and wellness.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

What experiences prompted adoptive parents of preadolescents to self-refer for child–parent relationship therapy?

Credits: None available.

Adoptive parents and preadolescent children experience unique relational challenges post-adoption. As a developmentally responsive and attachment sensitive approach, child-parent relationship therapy (CPRT) is an established evidence-based mental health intervention for adoptive families. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of adoptive parents of preadolescents which prompted self-referral to CPRT. Participants were 18 adoptive parents of preadolescents who self-referred for CPRT post-adoption. We identified four main themes which characterized parents’ experiences which prompted seeking treatment during preadolescence: adoption experiences, relationship components, parenting considerations, and child factors. This study helps inform mental health professionals working with adoptive families seeking play therapy services. Limitations and opportunities for future research are presented within the context of these findings.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss the applicability and evidence base for Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT).
  • Identify reasons that adoptive parents of preadolescents may self-refer to CPRT services.
  • Explain future research directions for CPRT and post-adoption services during preadolescence.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

A Case Application of Adlerian Play Therapy with Teachers to Combat Burnout and Foster Resilience

Credits: None available.

Students achievement is positively correlated with teacher encouragement. This article focuses on the use of Adlerian group play therapy principles and techniques to foster teacher resiliency and reduce burnout. A review of the factors impacting teacher burnout, a description of the practice of Adlerian group play therapy, and the benefits of play techniques with adults will be provided. A case applying Adlerian group play therapy principles and techniques with teachers for the purpose of combatting teacher burnout and fostering resilience will be presented and discussed, including considerations for implementation within a school setting.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the impact of teacher burnout on student academic performance
  • Discuss the foundational principles of the theory and practice of Adlerian Play Therapy
  • Apply the principles of Adlerian Play Therapy to working with adults
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Theraplay as a Family Treatment for Mother Anxiety and Child Anxiety

Credits: None available.

Anxiety is a prevalent form of child psychopathology and has been predicted by maternal anxiety and mother-child attachment. Given that attachment processes are intertwined with emotion regulation, attachment-based therapies that foster regulatory skills may be effective in treating anxiety. The attachment-based therapeutic approach, Theraplay therefore demonstrates promise for family anxiety treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine Theraplay as a treatment for maternal anxiety and child anxiety in families where both mothers and children (ages 4-7) had clinically significant anxiety. Six mothers and six children (n=12) with anxiety participated in treatment. Data were collected across three repeated baseline measurements, 12 Theraplay sessions, and a follow-up. Results indicated that all mother-child dyads’ anxiety scores decreased and were lower at the follow-up than at the baseline. In addition to reductions in anxiety, families demonstrated trends in increased closeness and decreased conflict post-treatment as measured by the Child-Parent Relationship Scale(CPRS; Pianta & Steinberg, 1992). Results demonstrate that Theraplay has a strong potential to be an effective anxiety treatment for both maternal and child anxiety.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skill and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Explain the mechanisms through which Theraplay is postulated to have an influence on both maternal and child anxiety.
  • Describe how Theraplay intervention influenced the mothers’ and their children’s anxiety scores.
  • Identify potential benefits of Theraplay as a treatment for families where mothers and children experience clinically significant anxiety.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

A Phenomenological Study of Theraplay Groups within a Middle School

Credits: None available.

Theraplay is an attachment enhancing, play-based intervention. We used a phenomenological study to explore the experiences of middle school students ( N = 21) participating in Theraplay groups, and found five overarching themes: (a) alternative to the lunchroom, (b) relationships and making connections, (c) perspective taking and challenging perspectives, (d) feelings about the group, and (e) recommendations for future groups. We discuss the clinical implications and recommendations for future research.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods

Learning Objectives:
  • Explain how Theraplay groups can be used with adolescents.
  • Incorporate Theraplay groups with adolescents in a school setting.
  • Provide specific examples of Theraplay group activities to use with adolescents.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Cultural Competence and Poverty: Exploring Play Therapists' Attitudes

Credits: None available.

This article reports the findings of a survey that investigated attitudes towards povertyamong play therapists (N = 390) and its relation to demographic information.Multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVA) were used to measure the relationshipbetween play therapists’ demographics and their attitudes towards poverty, specificallytheir structural, individual deficit, and stigma scores. Results indicated that both regionand age resulted in differing views on poverty. Participants living in the Northeast heldstronger structural views of poverty than participants in the South. Similarly,participants in the 50-59 and 60 plus age groups disagreed to strongly disagree with apersonal explanation toward poverty than participants in the 30-39 age group. Theimportance of play therapists’ examining their attitudes toward poverty and the directimpact on their work is discussed. Finally, implications of the results, including overallfindings, are explained.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify three impacts for children who grow up in poverty.
  • Give one example of how an individual’s attitude towards poverty (Structural, Stigmatizing, and Personal) may impact their professional play therapy practice.
  • Discuss one reason why play therapists’ region or age may cause a difference in attitudes towards poverty.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Child-Centered Play Therapy with Children Affected by Adverse Childhood Experiences: A Single Case Design

Credits: None available.

We conducted single-case research with two participants to explore child-centered play therapy’s (CCPT) influence on children who had four or more Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and provided analysis of data collected from the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire on a weekly basis and the Trauma Symptoms Checklist for Young Children at pre and post test. Both participants demonstrated significant improvement in total difficulties and prosocial behaviors, revealing potential therapeutic benefits for utilizing CCPT with children who have four or more ACEs. Encompassed in discussion of study results are implications for practice, suggestions for future research, and limitations.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify the impact CCPT had on two participants with four or more ACEs
  • Analyze how change occurs at various times.
  • Explain how the ACEs may impact children.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Child-Parent Relationship Therapy with Residential Care Workers

Credits: None available.

Children in the United States are experiencing a mental health crisis (Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, 2013; U.S. Public Health Service, 2000). One component of the array of treatment approaches for child mental health issues is residential treatment in which children receive therapeutic services in a residential setting. Children in residential treatment have experienced a variety of issues including disruptions in attachment (Walter, 2007). However, relationships are important to the success of treatment (e.g., Ayotte, Lanctôt, & Tourigny, 2016; Gallagher & Green, 2012). One promising approach to address this relational need is child-parent relationship therapy (CPRT; Landreth & Bratton, 2019). To investigate the effects of CPRT with residential care workers (RCWs), this study used a mixed-methods approach including a single-case experimental design and a qualitative case. More specifically, the study investigated effects of CPRT on RCWs’ (a) perceptions of children’s behaviors, (b) relationships with the children of focus, and (c) ability to demonstrate empathy in individual play sessions. The percentage of nonoverlapping data (Scruggs, Mastropieri, & Casto, 1987) was calculated and indicated that the treatment was very effective in helping participants increase the demonstration of empathy in play sessions. Qualitative descriptions of the relationship between the RCWs and their children of focus (COFs) were positive, but the quantitative data did not consistently align with the qualitative data across all participants. Two participants described ongoing experiences of behavioral challenges with their COF and one did not, which was supported by the quantitative data related to COFs’ behavioral problems.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify potential benefits of implementing CPRT with residential care workers working with children
  • Identify challenges to building relationships with children in residential care settings.
  • Identify additional research opportunities for understanding play-based interventions in residential care.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Child-centered Play Therapy and Academic Achievement: A Prevention-based Model

Credits: None available.

There is a significant need to provide intervention services not only to students who exhibit sustained disruptive behaviors in the classroom, failing grades, and/or significant attendance issues but also to address the emotional needs of diverse elementary students who are “at risk” prior to exhibiting such issues so they may be successful in the academic environment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the academic skills of second-grade students who received child-centered play therapy (CCPT) services using the Primary Project (formerly the Primary Mental Health Project) protocol. Sixty-eight students from 1 elementary school in second grade were assessed in the areas of task orientation, behavior control, assertiveness, and peer social skills. Of those who were tested, 36 students were deemed at risk using the established qualifying criteria and received CCPT services, and 32 students did not qualify for services. Findings revealed a significant increase in 3 academic subject areas: reading, mathematics, and language usage, with qualifying students experiencing marginally greater improvements during the academic year in mathematics and language usage when compared to their peers who did not qualify for services. Results of this study highlight the importance of providing preventive services that support overall mental health and wellness to at-risk children.

Play Therapy Primary Areas:

  • Skills and Methods
  • Special Topics

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify the core components and core objectives of Primary Project.
  • Identify connections between CCPT and academic achievement.
  • Identify the benefits of CCPT services for the students participating in this study.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00