International Journal of Play Therapy® Tests


Starting with the January 2018 issue, earn non-contact continuing education credit by completing tests based upon the International Journal of Play Therapy®. APT Members may refer to their print or online journal access to complete the tests.

  • Price includes CE test only.


Continuing Education

APA. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. APT maintains responsibility for this program and its content.



NBCC. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5636. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. APT is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.



APT. The Association for Play Therapy (APT) offers continuing education specific to play therapy. APT Approved Provider 95-100 maintains responsibility for the program.


Sessions

Investigating Group Adlerian Play Therapy for Children with Disruptive Behaviors: A Single Case Research Design


Date : July 2019

Volume Issue : Volume 28, Issue 3

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

Children with disruptive behaviors have an increased risk of ongoing and more severe problems throughout life. Early intervention can mitigate these consequences. We used a single-case design to research the impact of Adlerian group play therapy on children’s disruptive classroom behaviors. Results were mixed, with an overall improvement in children’s behaviors over the course of the study. Detailed results, implications, limitations, and suggestions for future studies are described.

Learning Objectives:
  • Recognize the additions of group Adlerian play therapy compared with individual.
  • Identify the components necessary to interpret a single case research design study.
  • Recognize areas for future research opportunities.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Child-Centered Play Therapy as a Means of Healing Children Exposed to Domestic Violence


Date : April 2019

Volume Issue : Volume 28, Issue 2

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

Increasingly, domestic violence is being recognized as a major concern for children today. Hamby, Finkelhor, Turner, and Ormrod (2011) of the U.S. Department of Justice discovered that approximately 8.2 million children were exposed to some form of family violence in the past year and 18.8 million over their lifetime as reported by a national survey. Witnessing physical as well as psychological–emotional violence within the family can cause serious detrimental effects to children. Younger children respond to domestic violence by having higher levels of psychological disturbance and display lower self-esteem than do older children. Likewise, other issues related to mental and physical health may manifest. Additionally, child witnesses of familial violence are taught to maintain the secret of violence; therefore, alternative forms to verbal expression are important in supporting this population. It is imperative that these child witnesses receive interventions that are developmentally appropriate and meet their unique needs. Play therapy has been proven to be a statistically effective means of treating externalizing and internalizing problems in children. Therefore it is proposed that child-centered play therapy interventions be applied when working with children exposed to domestic violence.

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify and describe characteristics of type II trauma (complex trauma).
  • Identify and discuss impacts of domestic violence on children.
  • Describe ways in which Child Centered Play Therapy (CCPT) heals trauma related to domestic violence.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Child Teacher Relationship Training as a Head Start Early Mental Health Intervention for Children Exhibiting Disruptive Behavior


Date : January 2019

Volume Issue : Volume 28, Issue 1

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

Head Start teachers and their aides (n = 23) were randomly assigned to either the experimental or active control group in this exploratory study of the effectiveness of child–teacher relationship training (CTRT) on 20 economically disadvantaged children exhibiting disruptive behavior. CTRT is based on the principles and procedures of child–parent relationship training (CPRT), a 10-session play based model, which uses parents and caregivers as therapeutic agents of change. Analysis of pre- to mid- to post-tests results revealed that, when compared to the active control group, CTRT demonstrated a large treatment effect on reducing children’s levels of disruptive behavior. The statistical, practical, and clinical findings of this study provide validation of CTRT as a viable early mental health intervention for preschool children in Head Start exhibiting disruptive behaviors.

Learning Objectives:
  • Provide readers with validation for Child Teacher Relationship Training (CTRT) as a viable mental health intervention for at-risk preschool children exhibiting disruptive behavior.
  • Identify importance of utilizing teachers and caregivers as therapeutic agents to reach a greater number of children.
  • Implement CTRT in training teachers to meet children’s social emotional needs more effectively.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Turning the Focus to Behavioral, Emotional, and Social Well-Being: The Impact of Child-Centered Play Therapy


Date : October 2018

Volume Issue : Volume 27, Issue 4

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

This study evaluated the impact of participating in child-centered play therapy for qualifying diverse second-grade students, implemented through the Primary Mental Health Project treatment protocol. This preventative approach focuses on the behavioral, emotional, and social skills of children through child-centered play therapy.Second-grade students at 1 elementary school were assessed by their teachers for 4types of behaviors: task orientation, behavior control, assertiveness, and peer/social skills. Results demonstrated significant improvement in all 4 areas assessed for students who qualified for and received services over the course of 1 academic year. Findings suggest that child-centered play therapy is an effective preventative approach for students who are at risk for developing adverse behaviors that could negatively impact their academic success. Implications and the importance of providing preventative intervention for at-risk children are discussed.

Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss the concepts related to the primary mental health project model and its implications.
  • Comprehend what behavioral, emotional, and social skills are and why they are crucial to academic success for children and youth.
  • Identify at-risk children, as well as the academic and health-related implications of at-risk children not being recognized.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Religious Faith in Play Therapy


Date : April 2018

Volume Issue : Volume 27, Issue 2

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

Religious faith is a recognized healing component in children’s mental health. How-ever, no research has been conducted on religious faith in play therapy. The aim of this survey was to identify play therapists’ awareness, knowledge, and skills related to religious faith in play therapy. Results of 308 registered play therapists (RPT) or RPT supervisors participating in the study showed that 82% endorsed religious faith or spiritual belief as being central to their own identity, 75% agreed that children have spiritual awareness, 88% reported confidence in identifying their clients’ religious beliefs, and 88% reported confidence in responding to children’s questions about God in a way that honors their religion. Themes of positive and negative displays of religious faith were identified. Findings are discussed.

Learning Objectives:
  • Recognize the role of religious faith in play therapy.
  • Develop awareness, knowledge, and skills related to children's religious faith.
  • Understand survey results of play therapists' awareness, knowledge, and skills related to religious faith in play therapy.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Part 2: A Qualitative Examination of Play Therapy and Technology Training and Ethics


Date : January 2018

Volume Issue : Volume 27, Issue 1

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

Technology use is rapidly expanding among children and adolescents (Harwood et al.,2011), yet it is unclear whether current trends in play therapy are adapting to address these trends. Further, little research has addressed the current training that play therapists receive in the use of technology. Ethically, therapists must obtain initial training and maintain competence in a particular treatment area to ensure effective application of a clinical intervention. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate clinicians’ training and understanding of the ethics of technology in the playroom.Participants included 13 registered play therapists (RPTs) and registered play therapist-supervisors (RPT-Ss). For the present study, the researchers conducted semi structured interviews and used qualitative content analysis research methodology to complete data analysis. Results suggest a general lack of familiarity with standards and ethics and adequate training in this area, though most participants expressed prospective comfort with technological interventions if they received adequate training opportunities. Findings from the study yield implications for training opportunities and clinical interventions.

Learning Objectives:
  • Develop a brief understanding about the societal shift toward technology and how this influences play therapy practice.
  • Provide readers with knowledge about play therapists’ training regarding incorporation of technological interventions in play therapy.
  • Provide awareness about play therapists’ present understanding of the standards and ethics of technology use in play therapy.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Indoor Nature-Based Play Therapy: Taking the Natural World Inside the Playroom


Date : July 2020

Volume Issue : Volume 29, Issue 3

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

Nature is a powerful partner in the counseling process; however, it is not always feasible to take clients outside for sessions. Nonetheless, practitioners may still involve nature within the counseling process by integrating natural materials within the counseling room. In this article, the integration of natural items within the playroom will be discussed, along with the presentation of a case illustration, and exploration of implications for practice and research.

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify various natural materials to integrate within the playroom.
  • Discuss cautions and considerations when integrating the natural world within the playroom.
  • Examine a case illustration integrating the natural world in the playroom.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Playing through the Unimaginable: Play Therapy for Traumatic Loss


Date : April 2020

Volume Issue : Volume 29, Issue 2

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

Play therapists inevitably work with traumatic death loss at some point in their careers. Unfortunately, most play therapists are not specialty-trained in traumatic loss, creating a treatment gap with this unique population. Although traditional methods of play therapy are empirically effective for traumatic death loss, adjustments in intake, toy selection, and termination can greatly enhance the therapeutic process. This article reviews the short- and long-term impacts of traumatic death loss, with a discussion of developmental processes and reactions to this painful experience. A detailed description of toy selection and traumatic play themes are discussed along with types of play demonstrated by traumatically bereaved children.

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify toys and items which facilitate traumatic grief play.
  • Describe the developmental reactions to traumatic loss in children.
  • Integrate procedures into the play therapy treatment process (e.g., intake, termination) which support the unique needs of traumatically bereaved children.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Play Therapy Treatment of Pediatric Medical Trauma: A Retrospective Case Study of a Preschool Child


Operation Level : Intermediate

Date : January 2020

Volume Issue : Volume 29, Issue 1

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

Play therapists have become sensitized to interpersonal trauma and its varied presentations and consequences. Children who experience frightening and painful medical procedures may become traumatized by these experiences. Personnel working in inpatient medical facilities are presumably familiar with emotional and behavioral presentations of pediatric medical trauma. However, underlying pediatric medical trauma may be overlooked in outpatient play therapy settings. This article describes the clinical case of a young child whose relatively severe emotional and behavioral problems masked medical trauma. Examples of thematic play sessions are presented to illustrate the child’s underlying trauma and the process of play therapy that led to considerable improvement. The importance of the play therapy relationship is emphasized. Play therapists are encouraged to consider the presence of pediatric medical trauma when assessing young children

with histories of medical intervention.

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify multiple examples of post-traumatic and abreactive play in children suffering from medical trauma.
  • Compare the similarities and differences between PTSD and PTMS.
  • Discuss how pediatric medical stress can be identified in young children who are brought to outpatient play therapy for services.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00

Part 2: The Virtual Environment Social Program for Youths with Autism Spectrum Disorder


Date : October 2019

Volume Issue : Volume 28, Issue 4

Level : Intermediate

Credits: None available.

This article describes a pilot study for a play-based intervention designed to support the development of social competence of youths with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) that includes play with the video game, Mine craft. Four boys with ASD, ages 11–13, participated in play with the video game during 8 1-hr sessions with a typically developing peer and 2 adults during structured play (role-based objective play) and free play (no roles or objectives) with video modeling, adult facilitation, and mediation from a typically developing peer. High rates of initiations were maintained during structured play; the quality of social play started as weak during free play but improved by the later sessions. Implications of the results for practitioners and researchers are discussed.

Learning Objectives:
  • Describe how video-game play can be utilized to create structured and free play social interventions.
  • Understand some of the difficulties faced by program designers when creating social competence programs and interventions for youth with ASD.
  • Analyze the play behaviors of youth with ASD as they use problem solving strategies to cooperate on shared tasks.
Speaker(s):
Standard: $10.00
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